An Educational Curriculum

post by DragonGod · 2017-11-22T10:11:58.779Z · score: 5 (2 votes) · LW · GW · 6 comments

Contents

  Goals
    Foundations of Intelligence
    Formalise learning
    Formalise knowledge
    "Solve" Intelligence
  Nota Bene
None
6 comments

I'm a CS student graduating next year, my education has been pretty crap, due to personal problems, and my school curriculum being pretty bad (we never met the requisite depth in any of the courses we did, and skimmed over a lot). After graduation, I want to take a few years (I'm thinking 3 - 6) off to do a lot of self study.

I'm not sure how my knowledge level compares to international standards, so just assume no prior CS knowledge (I'll skip things I already know satisfactorily, but I don't expect there to be anything I know deep enough that it would be worth skipping it completely).  For mathematics, I am at highschool level (currently learning algebra and logic in my free time) sans calculus (which I never really learned), with a little discrete maths. I have no prior philosophy training, and it I sufficient to assume that the entirety of my philosophy knowledge is from Lesswrong.


I have a (set of) goals I want to achieve, and I want to learn the required computer science (among other things) in order to achieve my goal. I plan on pursuing a postgraduate degree towards that goal after my gap years (I intend to start producing original research in at most ten years, and most likely much earlier than that).


Goals

Foundations of Intelligence

Formalise learning

Formalise knowledge

"Solve" Intelligence

Nota Bene

"Develop" doesn't mean that one doesn't already exist, more that I plan to improve on already existing models, or if needed build one from scratch. The aim is model that is satisfactorily (for a very high criteria for satisfy) useful (the criteria I listed above is my attempt at dissolving "useful". The end goal is a theory that can be implemented to build HLMI). I don't plan to (needlessly) reinvent the wheel. When I set out to pursue my goal of formalising intelligence, I would build on the work of others in the area).



How much CS/Maths/Analytical Philosophy/other relevant subject areas do I need to learn, what areas of CS/Maths/Analytical Philosophy/other relevant subject areas should I focus on, and how deep do I need to go? I want to prepare a complete curriculum for myself. I'd appreciate links to learning resources and recommended books, but I would also appreciate mere pointers.

6 comments

Comments sorted by top scores.

comment by korin43 · 2017-11-22T17:54:37.645Z · score: 10 (3 votes) · LW · GW

I don't know much about the specific goal you're working on, but my experience with CS has been that the best way to learn is to work on real problems with people who know what they're doing. I've learned significantly more from my internship and jobs than I did in school, and that seems to be pretty common. Rather than trying to design a curriculum, I'd advise trying to find someone doing what you're interested in and get a job/internship/apprenticeship working with them. After you've done that for a few years, I suspect you'll know what you're not getting out of the current deal and can either go off on your own or find a different set of teachers.

comment by DragonGod · 2017-12-11T06:30:02.915Z · score: 3 (1 votes) · LW · GW

I think this is a sensible idea, however I think I'm not at the level for this to be useful advice for me—I have a severe knowledge debt.

comment by ChristianKl · 2017-11-24T18:43:48.421Z · score: 7 (2 votes) · LW · GW

If you are interested in structured knowledge represenation, Wikidata can be fun. Discussion on Wikidata how something should be represented brings up a lot of practical concerns.

comment by DragonGod · 2017-12-11T06:28:46.048Z · score: 3 (1 votes) · LW · GW

I'll take a look at it.

comment by ChristianKl · 2017-11-22T10:39:04.580Z · score: 7 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Googling the abbreviation KRS doesn't give me any hits and Wikipedia doesn't provide a relevant explanation. I'm guessing it stands for knowledge representation system.

To me it seems like you want to tackle problem of philosophy while only looking at CS/Math. I think you would benefit from reading actual philosophy.

I would recommend three books:

  1. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas S. Kuhn
  2. Naming and Necessity by Saul A. Kripke
  3. Applied Ontology: An Introduction by Katherine Munn and Barry Smith

comment by DragonGod · 2017-11-22T10:44:58.723Z · score: 3 (1 votes) · LW · GW

It does stand for knowledge representation system. Learning Epistemology and ontology are on my list. Thanks for the recommendations.