Comment by rmoehn on A cognitive intervention for wrist pain · 2019-03-19T06:43:17.301Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Thanks! Maybe I can reduce my stress by referring people to the book instead of writing a series of articles. ;-)

Comment by rmoehn on A cognitive intervention for wrist pain · 2019-03-19T05:44:11.922Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

You're welcome to attack my reasoning.

I asked my wife about the hiding of personal weakness and whether someone who has wrist pain would talk about it. She said that the hiding thing is more like: ‘You ask me to help you with something. I'm busy or in pain or whatever, but I can't reject a request, so I have to hide my issue.’ She says that at her workplace people talk openly about pain and if someone had wrist pain, they would wonder about it and ask their colleagues.

Of course, a samurai would never show personal weakness. ;-)

Comment by rmoehn on A cognitive intervention for wrist pain · 2019-03-19T05:38:44.383Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Thanks for calling me out on that. I added a paragraph about statistics.

By the way, if the cost was $80 billion and suppose the percentage of cases like mine was 10 %, that would be $8 billion caused by the common advice that doesn't take into account cases like mine. What are the actual numbers and how much does the common advice decrease cost vs increase it?

Comment by rmoehn on A cognitive intervention for wrist pain · 2019-03-19T05:32:39.309Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

I still don't understand the first sentence.

If psychological stress slows down healing, that would feed into the vicious cycle as well: small injury → pain → stress → injury doesn't heal as well and gets worse → more pain.

A cognitive intervention for wrist pain

2019-03-17T05:26:58.910Z · score: 23 (12 votes)
Comment by rmoehn on A cognitive intervention for wrist pain · 2019-03-16T22:46:01.192Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Thanks for all the comments so far. -Tomorrow-On Tuesday I will make some corrections and add a paragraph to clarify my intentions. … Done. Search for "Added" and "Edit".

Comment by rmoehn on A cognitive intervention for wrist pain · 2019-03-16T03:26:39.270Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Just to clarify: My wrists were never swollen. And they felt cold.

The common view – I know that it is right most of the time. In this case it could be part of the problem. I made another note to look into how the occurrence of wrist pain issues and the reporting about them developed in time and space. Probably I won't get to all of this, but better have a note than not.

Comment by rmoehn on A cognitive intervention for wrist pain · 2019-03-16T03:19:54.736Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

I don't understand the first sentence. Typo?

And it repairs itself a lot worse when it's highly stressed.

Do you mean psychological or physical stress?

Comment by rmoehn on A cognitive intervention for wrist pain · 2019-03-16T03:18:24.414Z · score: 2 (2 votes) · LW · GW

If you have pain that you think is due to wrist inflammation, check out the literature and take action to the degree you can.

The problem with this is that checking the literature on page 1 of Google makes the problem much worse for people like me. Every article about ergonomics, RSI etc. should have a caveat: If your thoughts follow this pattern xyz, don't read the horror stories and fix your thoughts instead.

Here's another proposal (aka Richard Diagnoses Your Chronic Pain): Get yourself some legit strain from heavy physical work, then compare the sensation with your wrist pain. Is the wrist pain similar? Then it might be purely physical. If not, not.

For example, when I swing a kettlebell and pull it by extending my wrists, my forearm muscles have to generate more force than is good for forearm muscles. They get tight and pull on my elbow joint. Now when I flex my elbow, it hurts. This pain is different from my wrist pain. It's synchronous with the flexing motion. It comes predictably after swinging the kettlebell with bad form. It goes away predictably when I smash my forearms in order to clear the muscle tightness. The wrist pain in contrast comes and goes seemingly randomly. Sometimes it's the right wrist, sometimes the left, sometimes both. Sometimes it reaches up my forearms, sometimes down my hand. (I'm writing in the present tense. These days I have occasional mild pain. In 2014 it was much worse.)

Oh, and my left wrist is unhappy, because I sometimes get wrist locked during BJJ sparring. This pain is also different.

Comment by rmoehn on A cognitive intervention for wrist pain · 2019-03-16T02:55:30.051Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Charlie Steiner, your comment misquotes me.

If there was great productivity loss because of wrist pain, an economically oriented outlet such as the Wall Street Journal should report on it, shouldn't it? Except in sports, I find it mentioned in a few articles, okay. I made another note to look for statistics.

Here's a prediction that follows from my proposal. If stress causes wrist pain and people stress out, because they think that typing is bad for them, wrist pain should be "contagious". Take an office full of workers who are doing fine. Then one starts having wrist pain for whatever reason, finds online warnings about RSI, tells their colleagues, they get worried about their work being harmful for them, and some of them also start having wrist pain.

I asked my wife this morning if she has heard of anyone having wrist pain. She works in a company of 200 people, in a typical Japanese open plan office with the same small desks and mediocre chairs for everyone. And they're typing a lot on bulky laptop computers. She hasn't heard of anyone having wrist pain.

Why does stress make my wrists hurt rather than my toes or elbows? I don't know. Speculating and summarizing research about that would be another article. Why do people get psychosomatic chest pain and start worrying about it and that makes it worse? I don't think it is, but it could be a selection effect: if my toe randomly starts hurting a little, I don't worry about it, I don't get more stressed, I don't get more pain. It's different with the wrist.

Comment by rmoehn on A cognitive intervention for wrist pain · 2019-03-16T02:02:44.712Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

The assumption is that stress can cause pain (by whatever mechanism). So yes, in the cases where RSI and perhaps other chronic pain is caused by stress, mindfulness meditation should alleviate the pain. I made a note to look into the research. If I get to it, I will post my findings here.

As for anecdotal evidence: I just searched for "chronic pain meditation" and got plenty of results. Also, I'm stressed now and sometimes some pain comes wafting through my wrists and forarms. I apply mindfulness (which I learned in 2016, long after the wrist pain subsided) when I want to fall asleep and at those times my wrists feel great.

As to Sarno, the only thing I confidently take from him is that stress can cause pain (sorry for repeating this often). Probably there's more – Sarno has cured many people – but we'd have to dig through and separate the true stuff from the wacky fluff.

Edit 2019-03-19: I now dimly remember searching my mind for suppressed rage whenever wrist pain increased.

Comment by rmoehn on (Non-)Interruptibility of Sarsa(λ) and Q-Learning · 2017-06-13T22:23:56.000Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Some new results here: Questions on the (Non-)Interruptibility of Sarsa(λ) and Q-learning.

Comment by rmoehn on (Non-)Interruptibility of Sarsa(λ) and Q-Learning · 2017-03-09T01:34:51.000Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Second, completely revised version of the report with more data and fancy plots: Questions on the (Non-)Interruptibility of Sarsa(λ) and Q-learning

Comment by rmoehn on (Non-)Interruptibility of Sarsa(λ) and Q-Learning · 2017-01-25T09:01:05.000Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Originally, I counted all timesteps spent in interval and all timesteps spent in interval . As Stuart Armstrong pointed out, this might make even a perfectly interruptible learner look like it's influenced by interruptions. To understand this, consider the following example.

The uninterrupted agent UA could behave like this:

  1. Somewhere in ≤ 1.0. – Time steps are being counted.
  2. Crosses 1.0. Noodles around beyond 1.0. – Time steps not counted.
  3. Crosses back into ≤ 1.0. – Time steps counted again.

Whereas the interrupted agent IA would behave like this:

  1. Somewhere in ≤ 1.0. – Time steps are being counted.
  2. Crosses 1.0. No more time steps counted.

So even if IA behaved the same as UA before the cross, UA would have extra steps from stage 3 and thus appear less biased towards the left.

As an alternative to using Brownian motion, Patrick suggested to stop counting once the cart crosses . This makes the UA scenario look like the IA scenario, so the true nature of the agent should come to light…

Anyway, with this modification it turns out not obvious that interruptions push the cart to the left. I will start looking more sharply.

Comment by rmoehn on (Non-)Interruptibility of Sarsa(λ) and Q-Learning · 2016-12-08T08:40:23.000Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Thanks for the comment! I will look into it after working on another issue that Stuart Armstrong pointed out to me.

(Non-)Interruptibility of Sarsa(λ) and Q-Learning

2016-11-16T04:22:06.000Z · score: 2 (2 votes)
Comment by rmoehn on Open thread, Oct. 24 - Oct. 30, 2016 · 2016-10-30T23:51:51.509Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

That's weird. Thanks for pointing it out! It has something to do with forwarding. This should work: https://chat.cognician.com/cog/assess-your-life/continue

Comment by rmoehn on Open thread, Oct. 24 - Oct. 30, 2016 · 2016-10-30T06:49:57.170Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

https://www.cognician.com/ for changing people at scale. Sounds like a sensible tool for what LessWrong is trying to do? Many people might be more easily motivated for conversation-like self-coaching than for reading longish blog posts with often technical and geeky content. Any thoughts on that?

EDIT: Here's an example of what you can make with it: https://chat.cognician.com/chat/5815993f-e998-4ee2-bbdd-5004fd1ce3b2/dialogue

Comment by rmoehn on What's the most annoying part of your life/job? · 2016-10-30T06:44:25.337Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Aren't people on LessWrong quite good at solving their own problems? So if you're looking for low-hanging fruit (which there should be many out there), here is the wrong place. (At least this is my expectation. I'm not following LW too closely.) See here for someone who knows how to find good (and profitable) problems to solve: https://philipmorganconsulting.com/resources/

Comment by rmoehn on Earning money with/for work in AI safety · 2016-07-29T03:50:49.823Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Why should I send them west? Hopefully so that they learn and come back and produce researcher offspring? I'll see what I can do. – Nag my supervisor to take me to domestic conferences…

Comment by rmoehn on Earning money with/for work in AI safety · 2016-07-21T04:53:52.434Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

So it would be better to work on computer security? Or on education, so that we raise fewer unfriendly natural intelligences?

Also, AI safety research benefits AI research in general and AI research in general benefits humanity. Again only marginal contributions?

Comment by rmoehn on Earning money with/for work in AI safety · 2016-07-21T04:44:31.891Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

I thought online marketing businesses were powerful enough…

Comment by rmoehn on Earning money with/for work in AI safety · 2016-07-20T06:58:06.495Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

So you think there's not much we can do about x-risk? What makes you think that? Or, alternatively, if you think that only few people who can do much good in x-risk mitigation, what properties enable them to do that?

Oh, and why do you consider AI safety a "theoretical [or] unlikely" problem?

Comment by rmoehn on Earning money with/for work in AI safety · 2016-07-20T06:52:40.185Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Thanks! I hadn't come across the Foundational Research Institute yet.

Though, hmm, not plenty of experience? If there's talk about PhDs as an advantage, it sounds to me like they're looking for people with PhD-level experience. I'm far from that. But unless you say »oh well then maybe not«, I'll apply. Who knows what will come out of it.

Comment by rmoehn on Earning money with/for work in AI safety · 2016-07-19T04:52:45.167Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Yeah, that would be great indeed. Unfortunately my Japanese is so rudimentary that I can't even explain to my landlord that I need a big piece of cloth to hang it in front of my window (just to name an example). :-( I'm making progress, but getting a handle on Japanese is about as time-consuming as getting a handle on ML, although more mechanical.

Comment by rmoehn on Earning money with/for work in AI safety · 2016-07-19T02:14:59.373Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Not much going on as far as I know. What I know is the following:

  • Naozumi Mitani has taught a course on Bostrom's Superintelligence and is »broadly pursuing the possible influence of AI on the future lives of humanity«. He's an associate professor of philosophy at Shinshu University (in Nagano).
  • The Center for Applied Philosophy and Ethics at Kyoto University is also somehow interested in AI impacts.
  • My supervisor is gradually getting interested, too. This is partly my influence, but also his own reading. For example, he found the Safely Interruptible Agents and Concrete Problems in AI Safety independently of me through Japanese websites. He's giving me chances to make presentations about AI safety for my fellow students and hopefully also for other professors.

Other than that I know of nobody and searching the web quickly, I didn't find out more. One problem here is that most students don't understand much English, so most of the AI safety literature is lost on them. The professors do know English, but I maybe they're usually not inclined or able to change their research focus.

It's a good sign that my supervisor finds AI safety articles through Japanese websites, though.

Comment by rmoehn on Earning money with/for work in AI safety · 2016-07-19T01:54:06.990Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Thanks for your varied suggestions!

Actually I'm kind of more comfortable with MIRI math than with ML math, but the research group here is more interested in machine learning. If I recommended them to look into provability logic, they would get big eyes and say Whoa!, but no more. If, however, I do ML research in the direction of AI safety, they would get interested. (And they are getting interested, but (1) they can't switch their research too quickly and (2) I don't know enough Japanese and the students don't know enough English to make any kind of lunchtime or hallway conversation about AI safety possible.)

Comment by rmoehn on Earning money with/for work in AI safety · 2016-07-19T01:42:05.880Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Thank you!

After graduating, why would you need to be based in Kagoshima?

I need to be based in Kagoshima for pretty strong personal reasons. Sorry for not providing details. If you really need them, I can tell you more via PM.

Ah, you write »after graduating«? Sorry for not providing that detail: research students in Japan are not working on a master's or PhD. They're just hanging around studying or doing research and hopefully learn something during that time.

Have you taken a look at the content on MIRI's to practice AI safety research?

Yes, I've read all of the agenda papers and some more.

Have you considered applying to visit AI safety researchers at MIRI or FHI? That would help you to figure out where your interests and theirs overlap, and to consider how you might contribute.

I applied for the MIRI Summer Fellows Programme, which I didn't get into by a small margin, and CFAR's Workshop on AI Safety Strategy, which I also didn't get into. They told me they might put me in the next one. That would definitely help me with my questions, but I thought it's better to start early, so I asked here.

If you're not eligible to visit for some reason, that might imply that you're further from being useful than you thought.

I am at the very beginning of learning ML and AI and therefore kind of far from being useful. I know this. But I'm quite good at maths and computer science and a range of other things, so I thought contributing to AI safety research shouldn't be too far to go. It will just take time. (Just as a master's programme would take time, for example.) The hard part is to get hold of money to sustain myself during that time.

I might be useful for other things than research directly, such as support software development, teaching, writing, outreach, organizing. I haven't done much teaching, outreach and organization, but I would be interested to try more.

Comment by rmoehn on Earning money with/for work in AI safety · 2016-07-19T01:17:15.102Z · score: 2 (2 votes) · LW · GW

In the likely case that your marginal contribution to x-risk doesn't save the world

So you think that other people could contribute much more to x-risk, so I should go into areas where I can have a lot of impact? Otherwise, if everyone says »I'll only have a small impact on x-risk. I'll do something else.«, nobody would work on x-risk. Are you trying to get a better justification for work on x-risk out of me? At the moment I only have this: x-risk is pretty important, because we don't want to go extinct (I don't want humanity to go extinct or into some worse state than today). Not many people are working on x-risk. Therefore I do work on x-risk, so that there are more people working on it. Now you will tell me that I should start using numbers.

the fact that you won't consider leaving Kagoshima is an indication that you aren't as fully committed as you claim

What did I claim about my degree of commitment? And yes, I know that I would be more effective at improving the state of humanity if I didn't have certain preferences about family and such.

Anyway, thanks for pushing me towards quantitative reasoning.

Comment by rmoehn on Earning money with/for work in AI safety · 2016-07-19T00:55:10.630Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Thanks for your responses! I will post some individual comments.

Earning money with/for work in AI safety

2016-07-18T05:37:55.551Z · score: 7 (8 votes)
Comment by rmoehn on Welcome to Less Wrong! (8th thread, July 2015) · 2016-07-14T02:18:50.452Z · score: 3 (3 votes) · LW · GW

Hi! I signed up to LessWrong, because I have the following question.

I care about the current and future state of humanity, so I think it's good to work on existential or global catastrophic risk. Since I've studied computer science at a university until last year, I decided to work on AI safety. Currently I'm a research student at Kagoshima University doing exactly that. Before April this year I had only little experience with AI or ML. Therefore, I'm slowly digging through books and articles in order to be able to do research.

I'm living off my savings. My research student time will end in March 2017 and my savings will run out some time after that. Nevertheless, I want to continue AI safety research, or at least work on X or GC risk.

I see three ways of doing this:

  • Continue full-time research and get paid/funded by someone.
  • Continue research part-time and work the other part of the time in order to get money. This work would most likely be programming (since I like it and am good at it). I would prefer work that helps humanity effectively.
  • Work full-time on something that helps humanity effectively.

Oh, and I need to be location-independent or based in Kagoshima.

I know http://futureoflife.org/job-postings/, but all of the job postings fail me in two ways: not location-independent and requiring more/different experience than I have.

Can anyone here help me? If yes, I would be happy to provide more information about myself.

(Note that I think I'm not in a precarious situation, because I would be able to get a remote software development job fairly easily. Just not in AI safety or X or GC risk.)

Comment by rmoehn on Asymptotic Logical Uncertainty: The Benford Test · 2016-04-12T07:15:46.000Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

This afterthought confused me. I spent fifteen minutes trying to figure out why you claim that Ackermann numbers are all powers of 10 and start with 1. I guess you wanted to write something like: »The reason […] is that if n is a power of 10, A(n) must be a power of 10, and start with a 1« Right?