Comment by elo on Experimental Open Thread April 2019: Socratic method · 2019-04-18T22:19:41.956Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Sq is a tool. In that sense it can be used badly like a knife or in useful ways (like a knife).

What would make sq genuinely more useful again?

Comment by elo on Experimental Open Thread April 2019: Socratic method · 2019-04-18T22:18:08.453Z · score: 3 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Was that the whole point of Socratic questions? Would he have invented a shitty thing like that? Would it have survived time if it was just an elaborate trap technique? (seems strange to me if that were the case)

Comment by elo on The Hard Work of Translation (Buddhism) · 2019-04-16T07:04:32.012Z · score: 4 (2 votes) · LW · GW

[meditation technical stuff]

The breath isn't a solid sensation, it's made up of many smaller sensations. Some instructions suggest investigating the "start", "middle" or "end" of the breath. Try to find the very specific part of that and generally the instructions suggest that you won't find it because there is no such thing. Owing in the direction of impermanence.

There is a possible meditation method that makes/assumes "permanent" the breath and then practices concentration on the breath as an assumed permanent object. This is important because with increased concentration skill we can then investigate (investigate = insight practice, not concentration practice) and discover the breath is not quite "real" in the permanent bounded conceptual entity that we want it to be when we study it.

There is a possible method of studying the thought stream and the way it changes when the breath changes. This can be seen in simple ways by holding the breath, breathing very quickly, but also noticing the way the breath changes when talking about significant or important matters. Or the way the breath takes shape when angry or anxious. Or excited. There is an interesting breath movement that I see (personal experience here) in theraputic contexts that looks something like a big sigh out. It seems to be that when people are working with an issue and are ready to let go of the issue they breathe out. (in my personal experience) there's something weird and interesting in the way that the breath ends a thought stream like that.

From a Pranayama book (translated as "breath of life") was a suggestion that the thought stream is like a bird tethered to a post via a string. The mind can float around but is always pulled back to where the breath is.

Studying the breath happens either at the nose/mouth or at the chest region of the body, this happens to also be the physical location where a large number of emotional reactions are experienced through bodily sensations (book: "the body keeps score" is excellent). With intimate knowledge of the breath comes intimate knowledge of the subtle emotions floating around. That includes many of the tiny reactions that (personal experience) I might feel when I react to some experience in the world. If I want to better shape my experience, interfacing with my own body-based emotional reactions is pretty handy.

There are holotropic breathwork experiences, there are Wim Hoff breathing methods. There are a lot of breath based meditation concepts to explore.

Dan Brown in "pointing out the great way" adds to follow the in breath, and the out breath and in between shift the attention to the body sensations, so that there are no distractions to carry the mind away (as informed by a branch of Tibetan tradition)

(personal stuff:)

When I watch my breath, I notice when my posture is out, when there's even so much as a sheet of extra weight on my chest. When I'm leaning to the side.

I notice when I run, I can breath clearer.

I can notice when I'm getting distracted from the task at hand.

I notice when I'm overwhelmed with juggling too many things because of the way that adrenaline-feel in my body changes my breathing pattern.

I notice when I'm playing favourites (read: have a crush) with someone because my breathing does (something or other that I don't have pinned to specifics).

I (recently) notice other people's breath, and if I'm in contact with their body can read their emotions very accurately. I'd claim to be able to tell when someone is lying, but that's not quite it. I would claim to be able to read someone's mind but it's more like, "I can tell when someone changes their mind" based on the way their breathing changes, I can't read actual content (however for example: if we are in the same place and there's a sudden loud noise I can tell somewhat what their internal reactions are based on their breathing change)


Now what?

There's a lot of options of interesting things of value from studying the breath. Good books are "The Mind Illuminated" or "The Attention Revolution".

I would suggest you are not done. You sure did finish discovering a boring corner of meditation, don't stay there. There's plenty of valuable things to learn about the inside of the mind.

I would suggest that LW'ers are pretty good and can hurry up with the instructions. Definitely read a book about it because the ability to pick up a map, and follow it - will come easy to LW'ers.

Comment by elo on The Hard Work of Translation (Buddhism) · 2019-04-15T23:30:11.231Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

what was your thought stream doing while noticing your breath? The point is not entirely to get good at breathing, but to notice everything else as well.

Comment by elo on Highlights from "Integral Spirituality" · 2019-04-15T23:29:06.666Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Integral spirituality is an earlier Ken Wilbur work, I've just started "religion of tomorrow" and it might be what you are looking for. I am only a few pages in right now so no guarantees.

Comment by elo on Highlights from "Integral Spirituality" · 2019-04-15T23:26:21.960Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

colours are meant for efficiency of communication. (Knowing the colour coding) I can describe bringing red values into a blue system, or wanting to bring in healthy orange to a crushing blue bureaucracy (Spiral dynamics colours). Assuming other people also know the system, conversation can go on without me having to explain a whole load of conceptual framework.

Comment by elo on The Hard Work of Translation (Buddhism) · 2019-04-15T23:21:31.067Z · score: 5 (3 votes) · LW · GW

I feel like this needs it's own post and discussion. There's definitely a difference of opinion here worth clarifying.

Comment by elo on Highlights from "Integral Spirituality" · 2019-04-15T17:26:47.726Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Post-rational is a place of development, and it was named by various parties outside of lw terminology.

Integral becomes an organising principle for other concepts to rest in.

Comment by elo on The Hard Work of Translation (Buddhism) · 2019-04-14T23:38:40.103Z · score: 2 (3 votes) · LW · GW

I agree and I want to add that there is a shift away from learning from. The source of an original book, and instead learning from what other people have learnt. And the way they learnt, not just the (very old) original work.

Buddhist information is usually participatory. "go and see for yourself" and "don't take my word for it".

Comment by elo on The Hard Work of Translation (Buddhism) · 2019-04-13T07:24:09.922Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

My strategy is to try to create small exercises that people can try. Experiments or experiences that can show something.

I used to do this for rationality techniques too.

That's the best way I know how.

Comment by elo on The Hard Work of Translation (Buddhism) · 2019-04-12T08:51:33.725Z · score: 3 (2 votes) · LW · GW

There are a few of us that have "crossed over" as you call it.

From my journey it seems to be a developmentally relevant stage.

Comment by elo on The Hard Work of Translation (Buddhism) · 2019-04-10T10:51:04.666Z · score: 5 (3 votes) · LW · GW

Read Reggie ray "touching enlightenment with the body"

Comment by elo on Kenshō · 2019-04-05T03:55:33.764Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Best mapped in the very dense book, "pointing out the great way".

One path to enlightenment is to provide a moment of pure clear seeing (a state of mind) and align the rest of the mind with the path back there. Then let the result play out.

Comment by elo on Open Thread March 2019 · 2019-03-17T04:40:50.364Z · score: 3 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Try not to cling to the past. Instead appreciate what was, and find what is new.

Comment by elo on The application of the secretary problem to real life dating · 2019-03-16T21:43:07.201Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW
  1. It would depend how far away the candidates are from each other. 5% apart, 10% apart or 1% apart.
  2. Yes, the original problem assumes that you know nothing. If I were adapting for knowledge, I would be doing something very different and I can't think of what on short notice because that knowledge could be very variable
Comment by elo on The tech left behind · 2019-03-16T04:26:55.730Z · score: 3 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Bone conduction headphones but they are still alive and coming back into production. (and I would recommend them)

E cigarettes nearly died because the person who first patented them could not monetise them (I believe), then the patent ran out and people started manufacturing them.

There are lots of devices on advertising TV like the slap-chop and the steam mops that seem novel and useful but don't seem to be mainstream.

Comment by elo on The application of the secretary problem to real life dating · 2019-03-15T20:03:13.077Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Not that I know of. It would be possible to add in a factor. I imagine that you've just increased the "size of the pool". And can proceed accordingly.

What is the nature of the prior knowledge? I suppose predictions are possible.

I know people who read 100 resumes and interview the ones they think would be fit for the role. Anywhere from 0-15 candidates. It depends on how specific the role is and how urgent the job is.

Comment by elo on What Vibing Feels Like · 2019-03-12T04:30:26.919Z · score: 4 (2 votes) · LW · GW

It's worth considering the description of "acting via system 1". As similar and relevant to vibing as described.

Healthy rationality long term needs to integrate both s1 and s2. Not just get the s2 right. Also the more s2 functions that can be entrusted to s1 effectively, the more s2 is free to leap forward into smarter ways of doing things.

Comment by elo on What Vibing Feels Like · 2019-03-12T02:01:18.231Z · score: 6 (3 votes) · LW · GW

It's tricky, that's for sure.

It's less that thoughts alone are poison and more that, spending attention on thoughts is poison to the process of observing being (because it's distracting from the pure observing being-ness of being).

Enjoying the music is different from saying "I enjoy the music". In that difference is the difference between the thought and the doing part of enjoying the music.

Comment by elo on In My Culture · 2019-03-09T20:35:42.983Z · score: -7 (4 votes) · LW · GW

I would propose that the other warning was an entirely different case, and something that I stopped doing. If you want to call them the same, that's up to you.

Comparing comments:

(you) “This post seems dangerous to me, and I felt a strong sense of being manipulated while reading it. I don’t think this post accomplishes it’s stated goals. The ‘my culture’ frame doesn’t stop the statement from being pushy and coercive about your norms, I think it’s even worse because it gives the appearance of trying to not be pushy but actually just being subtle about it.”
(me) For me I try not to endorse or propagate frameworks that are designed to subtly oppress other people.
That includes calling out bad behaviour when I see it. I strongly disagree with this post. It’s not demonstrating healthy agency, it’s not delineating from unhealthy agency, it’s not couched in sensitivity and it’s not going to make the world a better place. And it doesn’t belong in rationalist cannon.

(you)“This post seems dangerous to me, and I felt a strong sense of being manipulated while reading it.
(me) For me I try not to endorse or propagate frameworks that are designed to subtly oppress other people.

You changed the frame of reference between internal (for me) and external (this post seem... -to me). Which means you broadened a subjective statement. I also didn't include an "I felt" or I would have probably included an "I feel" present tense statement if I were to include any.

(you) I don’t think this post accomplishes it’s stated goals.
(me) I strongly disagree with this post.

I didn't hedge with "don't think". I just stated my position, raw, "strongly disagree". I'd find mine better, but also add the comment that I didn't "think" about it, I "felt" strong disagreement. You shifted from "feeling" to "thinking". While I didn't state, "I feel strong disagreement" this is an entirely different frame of reference to "I think strong disagreement".

The ‘my culture’ frame doesn’t stop the statement from being pushy and coercive about your norms, I think it’s even worse because it gives the appearance of trying to not be pushy but actually just being subtle about it.”
It’s not demonstrating healthy agency, it’s not delineating from unhealthy agency, it’s not couched in sensitivity and it’s not going to make the world a better place.

I see that I used, "It's" and that was unclear. I was referring to the whole post. That's fine. I made a list of factors here. That might not have been clear:

  • not demonstrating healthy agency
  • not delineating healthy from unhealthy agency
  • not couched in sensitivity

. And because of this list (emotive argument follows without explanation) is not going to make the world a better place.

Your list:

  • pushy and coercive
  • worse because it gives the appearance of trying to not be pushy but actually just being subtle about it

Your list covers half of my list.

There's also the poetic intention of using a culture setting paradigm to describe how I would set a culture differently that seems to not transmit through text (for me... calling out bad behaviour... I strongly disagree...). If I were to rewrite:

The way I see this framework being used in the post, it feels like it's being used to subtly oppress people. I strongly disagree with this post. Here's what I would like to see in a better version of the post:
  • Demonstrating healthy agency
  • Delineating from unhealthy agency
  • Language use that is couched in sensitivity
  • Clear explanation of how this makes the world a better place
  • examples of where this can go wrong, and what not to do

Subtle pushiness is worse than overt pushiness because if someone does not want to overtly "follow me and do as I say" they have a chance to say so when I'm obvious about the instruction. There's less of a chance to avoid coercion when the instruction is, "haha, that's not how we do things where I'm from" (yes this is a strawman version but there's no guidance in the top post for navigating between the healthy and the unhealthy types of the framework).

I'm happy to discuss what makes a good comment and what makes a bad comment. Or my comment. Or my take on the two versions.

note. I seem to be paying attention to, gathering and including more detail than you are. I suspect this is causing more of a mess than I want. It also means that I am catching details of communication that are not always noticed by other people.

For example:

  • poetic writing
  • frames of reference
  • hedges
  • I think/I feel
  • list included in a paragraph
  • tenses
  • scope of statement
Comment by elo on Incorrect hypotheses point to correct observations · 2019-03-09T20:07:57.371Z · score: 5 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Of note, I did stop commenting in this way and shifted to different types of communication.

Comment by elo on In My Culture · 2019-03-09T04:31:36.494Z · score: -21 (6 votes) · LW · GW

You'd have to be an evil nincompoop to design and then publish, instructions for subtle manipulation on purpose. So no, I can't give you the credit of being that evil to purposely do that.

I wonder what culture it takes to make you as you are. In the way that you don't see what I see.

I will compile a list.

Comment by elo on In My Culture · 2019-03-09T04:15:23.686Z · score: -3 (10 votes) · LW · GW

If I think of a tool like "genetic selection". We can have a conversation about how genetic selection is a neat tool that allowed us to select wheat and build the modern bread industry. However if I start talking about genetic selection in terms of the reduction of inferior people and extermination of cultures that don't fit my vision of the right thing, we are suddenly not talking about the use of a tool. We are instead talking about the use of manipulation to get what I want.

The "in my culture..." linguistic strategy tool is just a tool.

In how it's being talked about, in how it's being presented and in the examples, it's being used in ways that manipulate, reject, oppress, suppress, override, and imply "rightness" over other people who might be unsuspecting to the method. I object to the propagation of the strategy without emphasis on the care, consent, acceptance, kindness aspects of interpersonal culture.

It feels like poison is seeping through every other sentence of the main document. Part of me is terrified to even touch this unholy mess for fear of accidentally picking up on the subtle manipulation techniques that are so deeply ingrained that they are such a blind spot for the author that he can't even notice the way it comes out in all his language.

I expect this is going to hit a sore spot. That's the nature of how people will often respond to manipulation. And the knee jerk reaction to people being challenged with such claims.

I want to note that my comment was the soft version of my brain repeating, "kill it with fire" as I read the document.

Comment by elo on In My Culture · 2019-03-07T10:00:57.508Z · score: -13 (13 votes) · LW · GW

For me I try not to endorse or propagate frameworks that are designed to subtly oppress other people.

That includes calling out bad behaviour when I see it. I strongly disagree with this post. It's not demonstrating healthy agency, it's not delineating from unhealthy agency, it's not couched in sensitivity and it's not going to make the world a better place. And it doesn't belong in rationalist cannon.

Comment by elo on Leaky Concepts · 2019-03-06T20:27:01.745Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

I should have linked that! Thank you

Leaky Concepts

2019-03-05T22:01:37.595Z · score: 20 (12 votes)
Comment by elo on Disclosing the unsaid · 2019-02-26T06:23:47.604Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

You may like the keywords "warm data" on the topic of data that includes people.

Comment by elo on Starting Meditation · 2019-02-26T01:25:42.583Z · score: 4 (2 votes) · LW · GW

That's another type of meditation. Throw in some "notice how this goes" and "monkey mind meditation" and you're still meditating

Comment by elo on Building up to an Internal Family Systems model · 2019-02-17T19:00:30.155Z · score: 6 (3 votes) · LW · GW

One of the skills here is an open minded flow of discussion between parts.

To get to an open minded discussion, the agents who are shutting down discussions need to form an agreement to discuss. That means no distraction, no sleepiness, no anxiety around the conversation.

This open discussion can be done for one part at a time or for the global, "discussions are safe" paradigm.

If "discussions are safe", then it's possible to ask the question, "what can't we talk about?" and find content/parts there. (there's still things I don't need to talk about very much, but I have no problem with them and talking about them. For example I prefer to look in an optimistic direction and point my mind there but I have no problem digging up all the fears, doubts and discomforts if that's needed)

Comment by elo on Pedagogy as Struggle · 2019-02-16T04:23:04.088Z · score: 5 (3 votes) · LW · GW

Optimising for student learning and growth requires participation from the student themselves who knows what they need. Some amount of structure and letting them figure it out for themselves

Comment by elo on Are there documentaries on rationality? · 2019-02-16T01:04:25.737Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

It's a relatively new area but I'd be keen for them to exist in the future!

Comment by elo on Three Kinds of Research Documents: Clarification, Explanatory, Academic · 2019-02-16T00:57:11.913Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

I would challenge this post that a good document should do all three. Preferably at the same time (although not always possible or easy).

Comment by elo on Emotional Climate Change - an inconvenient idea · 2019-02-14T23:21:08.532Z · score: 3 (4 votes) · LW · GW

It's not our job to imagine the best out of your idea. That's your job. Even the best ideas can fail if they don't have the transmission right.

I wonder if you can change your communication methods to make the concept more appealing?

Comment by elo on Emotional Climate Change - an inconvenient idea · 2019-02-14T16:16:28.146Z · score: 9 (5 votes) · LW · GW

Not thought out enough. Pessimistic and alarmist, incomplete. No solutions proposed.

These are your opinions on the climate. Other people believe other things.

Where did it come from to perceive all negative? And how would you feel if that were the case?

Good question though. Why do you think it got -12?

Comment by elo on The RAIN Framework for Informational Effectiveness · 2019-02-14T00:55:20.788Z · score: 4 (3 votes) · LW · GW

I don't care about the name but please order the headings to match whichever name you choose.

Comment by elo on Functional silence: communication that minimizes change of receiver's beliefs · 2019-02-14T00:54:24.214Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

reminds me of ideological turing tests.

Also of being a ghost.

Comment by elo on Functional silence: communication that minimizes change of receiver's beliefs · 2019-02-14T00:48:48.706Z · score: 3 (2 votes) · LW · GW

See the search term "holding space" for something remarkably similar but not identical. This may be the term you are looking for.

Comment by elo on The RAIN Framework for Informational Effectiveness · 2019-02-13T19:43:25.129Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

What's the difference between RAIN, RINA, ARIN, NIRA, Iran...

I quite like ARIN.

Could you standardise the order of the headings to match the acronym?

Comment by elo on The Hamming Question · 2019-02-11T18:10:38.633Z · score: 3 (2 votes) · LW · GW

[for clarity, we were both quoting other sources]

My opinion is that from trying the exercises several times over the course of the last few years, it's a valuable tool to help me see what I'm ignoring or what I need to deal with.

Comment by elo on The Case for a Bigger Audience · 2019-02-09T23:18:31.386Z · score: 2 (5 votes) · LW · GW

I was coining more terms and bringing them to lesswrong. I still do that but me doing that depends on my available time to write. Which is variable.

Dojo on stress

2019-02-09T22:49:59.890Z · score: 12 (5 votes)
Comment by elo on The Hamming Question · 2019-02-09T03:48:19.414Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

We encourage participants to occasionally ask “the Hamming question.”

Checking in on the match between your beliefs and your actions is a rea- sonable thing to do a few times a year. It can lead to increased motivation, positive shifts to better strategies, and a clearer sense of where your deepest priorities lie.

Comment by elo on The Hamming Question · 2019-02-09T03:46:00.803Z · score: 3 (4 votes) · LW · GW

Quoted from the 2016 cfar handbook:

Richard Hamming was a mathematician at Bell Labs from the 1940’s through the 1970’s who liked to sit down with strangers in the company cafeteria and ask them about their fields of expertise. At first, he would ask mainly about their day-to-day work, but eventually, he would turn the conversation toward the big, open questions—what were the most important unsolved problems in their profession? Why did those problems matter?

What kinds of things would change when someone in the field finally broke through? What new potential would that unlock? After he’d gotten them excited and talking passionately, he would ask one final question: “So, why aren’t you working on that?”

Hamming didn’t make very many friends with this strategy, but he did inspire some of his colleagues to make major shifts in focus, rededicating their careers to the problems they felt actually mattered.

Comment by elo on The Hamming Question · 2019-02-09T00:36:15.772Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

The way I understand it, Hamming was a real guy doing real annoying questions in Bell labs.

Comment by elo on The Hamming Question · 2019-02-08T23:07:49.205Z · score: 4 (3 votes) · LW · GW

Or, "it's too hard". Or, "I don't think I am good enough". Or plenty of other excuses that are not necessarily a good reason for not doing the thing.

The point is not to have an answer, but to ask the question and to check.

You are not smarter for having the answer, you are smarter for asking the question.

Comment by elo on Is this how I choose to show up? · 2019-02-08T02:23:13.866Z · score: 3 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Sure thing. I will work on it.

Is this how I choose to show up?

2019-02-08T00:30:27.798Z · score: 6 (4 votes)
Comment by elo on Does the EA community do "basic science" grants? How do I get one? · 2019-02-06T18:23:50.728Z · score: 5 (3 votes) · LW · GW

Are you familiar with the ea hotel?

Maybe post on the ea forums?

Comment by elo on How to stay concentrated for a long period of time? · 2019-02-05T01:04:18.691Z · score: 3 (2 votes) · LW · GW

I assume this was a shift in formatting from "comment" to "answer".

Comment by elo on How to notice being mind-hacked · 2019-02-04T05:54:30.340Z · score: 2 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Identity is supposed to shift. If your identity is fixed, why would that be a good thing? Seems like that's the self delusion bug

Comment by elo on How to stay concentrated for a long period of time? · 2019-02-03T17:07:18.026Z · score: 8 (6 votes) · LW · GW

Meditation can help train concentration. Meditation can also bring clarity to goals and allow you to notice when you don't want to pursue that one. It can also enable vividness control over dull moments.

(yes it feels like a super power at times these days and yes I'm using it to write.)

Comment by elo on Boundaries - A map and territory experiment. [post-rationality] · 2019-02-02T20:59:54.889Z · score: 2 (3 votes) · LW · GW

You are welcome to think this is utter nonsense and feel like this is insulting. That's fine. I understand that. It makes no sense to you and it seems like I'm gibbering about nothing.

I understand where you are and why you would say that. I'm sure it's very frustrating to see these new age platitudes and have no idea where I'm getting this from.

For me this is significant information, for the several people who have read it and privately messages me and been impressed and surprised by the experience. For myself and these people, there's something here that we see. It seems strange that I can talk in a secret language right under your nose and make sense to other people. How long until you wonder what that is and how you can see it for yourself?

Comment by elo on Boundaries - A map and territory experiment. [post-rationality] · 2019-02-01T19:12:46.777Z · score: 0 (2 votes) · LW · GW

I would have answered that question with, "we don't know yet". But I don't know my physics to say if that's correct.

Boundaries - A map and territory experiment. [post-rationality]

2019-02-01T02:08:35.372Z · score: -21 (7 votes)

In what way has the generation after us "gone too far"?

2019-01-24T10:22:34.063Z · score: 8 (4 votes)

The Tether Theory and the Concrete, Subtle and Causal tiers

2019-01-14T00:07:50.829Z · score: 13 (4 votes)

Lesswrong Sydney - Dinner - Scott Aaronson comes to town!

2018-12-28T18:33:53.592Z · score: 7 (1 votes)

Feedback from emotions

2018-10-02T03:53:09.614Z · score: 0 (9 votes)

Code Switch

2018-09-29T00:32:18.302Z · score: 3 (4 votes)

Attacking enlightenment

2018-09-28T01:18:38.233Z · score: 28 (22 votes)

What is your relationship with your self?

2018-09-04T01:32:19.287Z · score: 5 (8 votes)

Open Thread September 2018

2018-08-31T21:38:19.118Z · score: 9 (6 votes)

Emotional Training Model

2018-08-01T06:41:09.832Z · score: 11 (6 votes)

Open Thread August 2018

2018-08-01T01:49:18.598Z · score: 26 (7 votes)

The Feedback Problem

2018-07-29T23:54:13.059Z · score: 21 (11 votes)

The Experimental Apparatus

2018-07-26T22:16:35.782Z · score: 9 (2 votes)

The problem of other minds

2018-07-24T01:04:06.396Z · score: 4 (7 votes)

The lesswrong slack - an introduction to our regulars

2018-06-04T06:29:18.247Z · score: 60 (19 votes)

Open Thread June 2018

2018-05-31T22:34:56.656Z · score: 31 (10 votes)

Open Thread May 2018

2018-05-01T06:23:37.468Z · score: 31 (9 votes)

Remembering the passing of Kathy Forth.

2018-04-16T01:53:56.536Z · score: 45 (37 votes)

I'm going to help you quit Facebook with some science

2018-04-12T03:09:30.324Z · score: 55 (19 votes)

Basic model of Sending a Message (Communication 101)

2018-03-25T23:55:52.888Z · score: 7 (9 votes)

Rationality Sydney pub meetups and Lesswrong Dojos

2018-03-12T00:09:47.215Z · score: 4 (1 votes)

Two kinds of Agency

2018-02-08T06:28:18.505Z · score: 25 (8 votes)

Complainy and Explainy voice

2018-01-18T01:47:09.374Z · score: 18 (6 votes)

How I accidentally discovered the pill to enlightenment but I wouldn’t recommend it.

2018-01-03T00:37:53.005Z · score: 3 (5 votes)

How I accidentally discovered the pill to enlightenment but I wouldn’t recommend it.

2018-01-03T00:37:18.450Z · score: 8 (9 votes)

Object level weight loss tips

2018-01-01T22:15:01.427Z · score: 1 (3 votes)

The answer sheet

2017-12-31T00:26:08.144Z · score: 38 (9 votes)

2017: A year in Science

2017-12-30T06:09:41.666Z · score: 20 (6 votes)

Books I read 2017 - Part 1. Relationships, Learning

2017-12-18T09:38:43.505Z · score: 26 (11 votes)

Meaning wars

2017-12-14T23:17:01.874Z · score: 20 (12 votes)

Problems as dragons and papercuts

2017-11-03T01:42:01.492Z · score: 5 (3 votes)

Problems as dragons and papercuts

2017-11-03T01:41:53.922Z · score: 1 (1 votes)

Cutting edge technology

2017-10-31T06:00:42.665Z · score: 24 (8 votes)

Cutting edge technology

2017-10-31T06:00:30.068Z · score: 2 (2 votes)

Open thread, October 30 - November 5, 2017

2017-10-30T23:37:03.960Z · score: 2 (2 votes)

Halloween costume: Paperclipperer

2017-10-21T06:33:01.203Z · score: 13 (6 votes)

Halloween costume: Paperclipperer

2017-10-21T06:32:36.868Z · score: 5 (5 votes)

Use concrete language to improve your communication in relationships

2017-10-19T03:46:50.403Z · score: 18 (9 votes)

Use concrete language to improve your communication in relationships

2017-10-19T03:46:38.046Z · score: 2 (2 votes)

dojo - Bad day contingency plan

2017-10-02T07:46:53.852Z · score: 12 (5 votes)

Bad day contingency Dojo

2017-10-02T07:43:40.861Z · score: 2 (2 votes)

Fish oil and the self-critical brain loop

2017-09-15T09:53:36.343Z · score: 3 (3 votes)

Paranoia testing

2017-08-25T04:41:15.186Z · score: 0 (0 votes)

Emotional labour

2017-08-22T00:54:20.887Z · score: 4 (4 votes)

Repairing Anxiety using Internal and External locus of control models

2017-08-12T08:05:03.779Z · score: 3 (3 votes)

Models of human relationships - tools to understand people

2017-07-29T03:31:25.612Z · score: 26 (19 votes)

How long has civilisation been going?

2017-07-22T06:41:20.830Z · score: 7 (7 votes)