Posts

Meetup Cookbook 2018-07-14T22:26:26.853Z · score: 74 (26 votes)
How To Build A Community Full Of Lonely People 2017-05-17T15:25:18.478Z · score: 6 (7 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Projects 2017-03-17T05:31:27.574Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Cooking 2017-03-02T02:26:24.490Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Projects 2017-02-19T17:51:23.728Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Board Games 2017-02-09T04:52:59.139Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Stories 2017-02-03T01:21:26.553Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Group Debugging 2017-01-26T06:13:01.881Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Revealed New Year's Resolutions 2017-01-04T21:46:54.589Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Short Talks 2016-12-15T05:01:41.855Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Projects 2016-12-11T20:18:22.488Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Cooking 2016-12-02T03:04:05.355Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Mini Talks 2016-09-22T15:23:22.590Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Projects 2016-09-11T20:36:48.767Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Fun and Games 2016-08-20T15:13:24.383Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Group Debugging 2016-08-11T04:59:20.298Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Projects 2016-08-04T00:44:27.342Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Fun and Games 2016-07-28T04:18:37.589Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Very Short Talks 2016-07-22T00:24:54.425Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Cooking 2016-06-30T15:24:13.355Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Projects 2016-06-23T16:03:54.960Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Fun and Games 2016-06-14T15:09:50.573Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Group Debugging 2016-06-09T16:24:57.186Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : SF Meetup: Stories 2016-06-02T02:25:40.802Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : San Francisco Meetup: Board Games 2016-03-16T02:01:03.053Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : San Francisco Meetup: Group Debugging 2016-03-14T14:37:08.516Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : San Francisco Meetup: TED talks 2015-10-25T17:41:39.919Z · score: 1 (2 votes)
Meetup : San Francisco Meetup: Projects 2015-08-27T15:05:36.951Z · score: 1 (2 votes)
Meetup : Washington DC: Robin Hanson visits to talk about giving 2014-03-25T17:47:07.818Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : Washington DC: Anthropics with Robin Hanson 2013-10-21T03:58:55.739Z · score: 2 (3 votes)
Meetup : Washington, DC: Goals 2013-08-30T20:13:42.473Z · score: 0 (1 votes)
Meetup : Washington DC meetup: Robin Hanson visits again 2013-08-14T01:50:37.453Z · score: 2 (3 votes)
[Link] You May Already Be Aware of Your Cognitive Biases 2013-02-21T13:23:58.792Z · score: 6 (7 votes)
Meetup : Washington, DC Meetup with Special Guest 2012-12-19T04:43:35.222Z · score: 2 (3 votes)
Meetup : DC Meetup: Games and Conversation 2012-10-17T23:40:34.608Z · score: 1 (2 votes)
[LINK] Learning without practice, through fMRI induction 2012-10-07T03:15:09.561Z · score: 2 (5 votes)
[POLL RESULTS] LessWrong Members and their Local Communities 2012-05-21T16:37:17.426Z · score: 2 (8 votes)
[POLL] Do You Feel Oppressed? 2012-05-03T02:42:27.005Z · score: 8 (10 votes)
[LINK] System 2 thinking decreases religious belief 2012-04-27T13:36:47.077Z · score: 7 (9 votes)

Comments

Comment by maia on Meetup Cookbook · 2018-07-19T06:37:22.970Z · score: 4 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Oh yeah, I forgot to suggest doing rounds of names during the introductory period of the meetup. That's helpful too. (A benefit of being the organizer is it's much easier to remember everyone's name, because if you have a bunch of regulars, you only have to remember one or two new names each week.)

I'm skeptical of making an FAQ for new people, unless it's genuinely made up of questions that you, personally, have received in this circumstance. Seems likely to come off as condescending.

My strategy with people who seem like they come from very far outside the LW subculture is to try to meet them where they are... ask questions like "what did you find interesting about rationality / why did you come here?" and try to meet them in the middle, or have a productive conversation if you have obvious disagreements. Focus on areas where you have commonalities, rather than telling them everything they are wrong about right off the bat.

But I don't get too much practice with this, since most of our new people find the meetups through the LW website.

Comment by maia on Meetup Cookbook · 2018-07-15T05:34:22.911Z · score: 3 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Nope, that is not right.

Our schedule is weighted towards doing things that are simpler and have good replay value. We do board games and projects each once every 5 weeks, Group Debugging a little less often than that, and mix the remaining meetups in semi-arbitrarily, at a frequency of once every couple months for each type.

We do almost no explicit rationality content at all. Only reading discussion meetups could be described as that, and we do them very rarely.

People talk amongst themselves about whatever they want. Usually the structured portion of the meetup is about 1/3 of the total time, and the rest is just general conversation. There's a fair amount of it that ends up being related to rationality inside baseball, but it depends on who shows up and what they're thinking about on a given week.

Comment by maia on Open Thread June 2018 · 2018-06-16T07:54:46.488Z · score: 7 (2 votes) · LW · GW

So you don't like the gamification on the app. Have you considered... using a less gamified app to track workouts? Or not using an app at all?

Comment by maia on How To Build A Community Full Of Lonely People · 2017-05-17T15:53:14.998Z · score: 4 (4 votes) · LW · GW

I'm okay at it. Step 1 is to actually know things about the interests of people. To do that, you have to be reasonably good at one-on-one conversation: asking people open-ended questions, showing genuine interest in them, etc. That's how you find out what they're interested in in the first place.

Once you've done that, Step 2 is just to mention it to each of them when they are both present, especially when you're introducing them. "This is X, they are a professional Y and also like to do Z in their spare time" works well if you already know the other person is interested in Y or Z.

Comment by maia on Stupid Questions January 2015 · 2015-01-03T08:44:27.889Z · score: 2 (2 votes) · LW · GW

The DC LessWrong group has a strong norm of splitting up conversations into multiple, which works well if people are being bored by a single person talking - one person will turn to someone else who looks bored and strike up a different thread with them. (Then if other people also are bored, they will join the separate thread or start their own.)

This fixes a few other conversational problems as well.

Comment by maia on 2014 Less Wrong Census/Survey · 2014-10-30T04:56:21.908Z · score: 31 (33 votes) · LW · GW

Took the survey. Anyone else concerned that "largest bone in the body" isn't very well-defined? Largest by volume, longest measurement, ... ?

Comment by maia on How do you approach the problem of social discovery? · 2014-05-09T01:27:26.566Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Thanks for the feedback! I'll keep this in mind. We sometimes have discussions about changing the structure of meetups, and doing regularly-scheduled day changes might be something to talk about.

I also might be setting up a hiking meetup on a Saturday sometime in the near future; is that something you'd be interested in?

Comment by maia on How do you approach the problem of social discovery? · 2014-04-22T23:20:31.262Z · score: 2 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Lot of DC area people in this thread, it seems. Are you near enough that a plug for the DC LessWrong meetup would make sense? If so: consider attending your local DC LessWrong meetup, because we are cool and you are probably cool.

Also, which swing dances do you tend to go to? I have gotten part of our group together to go to the one on U St. a few times.

Comment by maia on How do you approach the problem of social discovery? · 2014-04-22T23:16:14.211Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Pretty much just for socializing / fun.

Comment by maia on How do you approach the problem of social discovery? · 2014-04-22T23:15:34.118Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Hmm, okay. What types of meetups would you enjoy?

(I'm asking this as a co-organizer. We try to ask people what they want and accomodate to the degree possible.)

Comment by maia on How do you approach the problem of social discovery? · 2014-04-22T03:16:05.379Z · score: 3 (3 votes) · LW · GW

Obligatory plug: If you want to be even more of a social supernode, why not increase your circle by attending your local DC LessWrong meetup? :-):-)

Comment by maia on How valuable is volunteering? · 2014-03-31T03:31:28.025Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Typo:

Factors that cut against volunteering have social value

should be "having"

Comment by maia on Rationalist fiction: a Slice of Life IN HELL · 2014-03-26T00:42:00.315Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Ehh... As the other commenters are saying, it's unclear how it would promote rationality, or what its Ultimate Effect would be...

But I think you should do it anyway. I'd read it.

Comment by maia on Rationality Quotes March 2014 · 2014-03-13T14:26:35.022Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Remember, you expect 5% to give a statistically significant result just by chance...

Comment by maia on Open thread, 11-17 March 2014 · 2014-03-13T12:53:24.296Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

I suspect that predicting trends in the pay for a certain career path doesn't need to be that precise in order to be useful. If you can predict the year in which it'll happen, you make huge piles of money. If you can predict the decade in which it'll happen, maybe you can't do that as well, but you could still make a choice to do something else.

Comment by maia on Open thread, 11-17 March 2014 · 2014-03-13T12:50:35.720Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Cal Newport's 'solution' to this is basically: Get good at something and then you'll enjoy it; expecting to enjoy anything that you are not yet good at is unrealistic. I think this probably isn't the entire story, because natural aptitude and enjoyment are real things that can cause you to like things more or less initially... But for me at least, this does explain a lot of my enjoyment of things. I find that there are some programming tasks I used to really hate doing, which I now dig into feeling fine, because I've gotten good at them. It probably depends on your personality and how you react to different incentives, as well.

Comment by maia on Irrationality Game III · 2014-03-12T19:05:23.590Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Could you be more specific about what you mean by that?

Comment by maia on Open thread, 11-17 March 2014 · 2014-03-12T16:17:40.638Z · score: 3 (3 votes) · LW · GW

The iconic "working in video games is awful" story: EA Spouse

Comment by maia on Open thread, 11-17 March 2014 · 2014-03-12T05:25:31.747Z · score: 7 (7 votes) · LW · GW

Have you tried asking them if there's any way you can help, and/or expressing generic sympathy?

"Hey, you seem to be going through a lot lately, are you holding up okay? Anything I can do?"

Comment by maia on Open thread, 11-17 March 2014 · 2014-03-12T05:23:07.784Z · score: 9 (9 votes) · LW · GW

Consider reading some of Cal Newport's writing on careers. Here's a possible starting point.

A lot of what he writes boils down to: "Do what you love to do" is a bit of a fallacy. Getting really good at something pretty much always involves putting in a ton of work, not all of which will be pleasant. But if you do that and get extremely good at what you do, then you'll get lots of jobs you'll enjoy, because 1) being good at what you do is fun and 2) if you provide lots of value to other people, they will provide it back.

IOW, just going after what is the most "fun" when you start doing it probably isn't the best idea. I wouldn't take the fact that your CS courses are a bit drudge-y as a slamdunk indicator that you shouldn't do CS by a long shot.

Also, you may have heard this before, but the video game industry for programmers is kind of a shitshow, because lots of people want to do it, enough so that they're willing to be paid less and endure crappy conditions. Being an indie developer might be a better bet, if you can make it work; I have no idea what the odds of success there are.

Comment by maia on Optimal Exercise · 2014-03-10T04:43:50.007Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

So I'm currently doing Starting Strength: no upper pulls, and different set/rep counts than what you say is optimal. Do you think it's worth transitioning to what you recommend here, and if so, any suggestions on how to do that transition?

Comment by maia on Amanda Knox Redux: is Satoshi Nakamoto the real Satoshi Nakamoto? · 2014-03-07T01:44:02.320Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

That's good to know. It's not much evidence either way, though. The real Satoshi would probably say something very similar to that.

Comment by maia on Lifestyle interventions to increase longevity · 2014-02-28T04:42:39.299Z · score: 2 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Hmm. Do the studies account for this?

Also, that would mean women on medication that stops their period also might have this problem.

Comment by maia on Open Thread February 25 - March 3 · 2014-02-25T21:39:50.815Z · score: 4 (4 votes) · LW · GW

Because destroying money is viscerally aversive and surprising?

Comment by maia on Testing my cognition · 2014-02-20T15:40:32.735Z · score: 2 (2 votes) · LW · GW

The way to handle this is probably to do the tests for a while, plotting the results, wait until they appear to be flatlining, then start the experiment.

Comment by maia on Open Thread for February 11 - 17 · 2014-02-12T20:16:25.245Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

If you have the skills to do software interviews well, the hardest part will be getting past resume screening. If you can, try to use personal connections to bypass that step and get interviews. Then your skills will speak for themselves.

Comment by maia on White Lies · 2014-02-09T17:18:31.655Z · score: 5 (5 votes) · LW · GW

I bet wouldn't too much

Off by one.

Comment by maia on How to become a PC? · 2014-01-27T20:09:07.069Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

There's also the option of trying to find a method of exercise that avoids as many of those willpower-draining hassles as possible. If you can, that is.

Comment by maia on Flashes of Nondecisionmaking · 2014-01-27T20:06:38.412Z · score: 10 (10 votes) · LW · GW

No, this discussion is substantially different, actually. It's not about the metaphysics of "do we REALLY control our own actions, even when we're trying to? I mean REALLY?" It's more like, "Under what circumstances is our brain even consciously thinking about what we're doing, and under what circumstances are we just operating out of habit?" You don't have to have an opinion on the metaphysics of the thing to have an opinion on the physical reality and physical question: do we think in a self-aware way about most things, or not?

Comment by maia on How to become a PC? · 2014-01-27T19:39:17.731Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

... I don't suppose any of those first-degree relatives are also interested in becoming more fit and healthy?

Comment by maia on How to become a PC? · 2014-01-26T21:31:46.490Z · score: 9 (9 votes) · LW · GW

If you can find someone else to exercise with, it could help a lot. For me having someone else counting on me to show up is an excellent motivator.

Comment by maia on Open thread, January 25- February 1 · 2014-01-26T18:36:31.744Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Do you have an in-person community that you feel close to?

What I'm trying to get at is, does it bother you specifically that you are alienated from "society at large," or do you feel alienated in general?

Comment by maia on Open thread, January 25- February 1 · 2014-01-25T20:28:32.671Z · score: 8 (8 votes) · LW · GW

Seems to me that that's likely a self-fulfilling prophecy, which I subjectively estimate is at least as likely to prevent you from doing better as an actual biological problem. Maybe try to think of more ways to get better at it - perhaps some different kind of exercises - and do your best at those, before drawing any conclusions about your fundamental limits... because those conclusions themselves will limit you even more.

Comment by maia on Open thread, January 25- February 1 · 2014-01-25T20:24:29.065Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Attending a CFAR workshop and session on Bayes (the 'advanced' session) helped me understand a lot of things in an intuitive way. Reading some online stuff to get intuitions about how Bayes' theorem and probability mass work was helpful too. I took an advanced stats course right after doing these things, and ended up learning all the math correctly, and it solidified my intuitions in a really nice way. (Other students didn't seem to have as good a time without those intuitions.) So that might be a good order to do things in.

Some multidimensional calc might be helpful, but other than that, I think you don't need too much other math to support learning more probability and stats.

Comment by maia on Tell Culture · 2014-01-21T00:25:30.030Z · score: 2 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Alternately, they say: "Uh, actually, I was enjoying that conversation. In particular, I was interested in the part where [stuff]. Maybe we could focus on talking about that part?" And then maybe you compromise on a conversational topic, rather than interpreting the rejection of the conversation as a rejection of you.

Or in the ideal case, "Oh, I wasn't actually enjoying it either, I was just talking about it because I thought you still wanted to. Great, let's change the subject."

Comment by maia on Fascists and Rakes · 2014-01-05T05:48:04.735Z · score: 9 (9 votes) · LW · GW

I think the poster's intent was to invent an example so that this post would be on the meta-level, instead of being about a particular issue.

You may have interpreted it as being about a particular issue, but I don't think that was on purpose, as evidenced by the fact that someone else interpreted it as being about a different particular issue.

Comment by maia on Local truth · 2013-12-21T23:14:57.491Z · score: 4 (4 votes) · LW · GW

Oh man! Disagreement! I like disagreement!

There is a universal arrow of time.

I'm not sure what you mean by this, but based on what I'm guessing you mean, I don't think this is actually accepted as truth by physicists. In particular, physics is supposed to work the same in reverse.

Making humans overall (more) happy is good.

This is more of a moral claim than a psychological one; it's normative, not descriptive.

Markets are efficient.

I don't think most people believe this. I think the economists I know would say that it's closer to something like, "Markets tend towards efficiency in the absence of outside influences."

Capitalism requires continuous economic growth.

Not sure what you mean by this, but it sounds probably wrong to me intuitively. Why do you think this is true - or if you don't, why do you think other people think it is true?

Comment by maia on [Meta] Post-meetup reports and discussion · 2013-12-21T21:51:38.825Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Good idea!

Though, note: Some require you to ask for permission to see the list, for reasons of privacy. So there is some conflict between making this knowledge publicly available and the privacy. I'll suggest doing this for DC, though, since ours is public.

Comment by maia on [Meta] Post-meetup reports and discussion · 2013-12-21T19:31:31.220Z · score: 2 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Most meetups have more information on their mailing list. You could check out the DC one, for example; we keep brief meetup logs, but also have a variety of conversations on the list sometimes, which might give you a better idea of what goes on. Or if there's a meetup near you, you could check out their list.

Comment by maia on [Meta] Post-meetup reports and discussion · 2013-12-21T14:26:26.263Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

Please be aware that our meetup is not necessarily typical; in fact, I'm pretty sure it isn't. I get the strong impression, from talking to organizers and attending meetups in other cities, that our meetups are more casual and involve fewer presentations than most meetups do.

That said, I'm not sure how often we have insights worth discussing, in part because I haven't been attending meetups much over the past few months... I think it varies a lot.

Comment by maia on [Meta] Post-meetup reports and discussion · 2013-12-21T04:52:43.503Z · score: 4 (4 votes) · LW · GW

It's extra work

This is why DC doesn't do detailed meetup reports.

We do keep brief logs after every meetup, though. We agreed not to mention who attended a meetup (the person posting the log has to bite the bullet, but only them) for privacy reasons, and just post one or two sentences about what happened.

Comment by maia on Open thread for December 9 - 16, 2013 · 2013-12-17T04:58:03.153Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

Check out /r/suggestalaptop?

General comments: SSDs are generally faster than magnetic drives, but often fail much sooner.

If you're not positive you want to replace it altogether: You might be able to fix your heat/slowness issues just by taking a can of compressed air to it. And you could probably buy a new battery. Replacing it might still be a better proposition overall, though...

Comment by maia on Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, part 28, chapter 99-101 · 2013-12-13T16:53:56.618Z · score: 4 (4 votes) · LW · GW

Jumping to the conclusion that its fixated on him and won't just attack some other child is really arbitrary.

Maybe this is just my narrative epistemic advantage talking, but: the centaur mentioned stuff relevant to the prophecy, knew specifically who Harry was, and probably was trying to kill him for a very specific reason.

Even if Harry doesn't realize what the centaur is talking about, it seems to me that of the people who try to attack and kill Harry Potter, probably most of them are actually trying to kill him specifically and are not just random psychopaths.

Comment by maia on Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality discussion thread, part 28, chapter 99-101 · 2013-12-13T16:49:50.913Z · score: 19 (19 votes) · LW · GW

As in this comment: Probably Quirrell is lying. When he realized Harry was upset about the centaur dying, he thought fast and Inferiused the centaur and made up the bit about green stunners.

IIRC, in canon Avada Kedavra has a distinctive color not shared by any other spell.

Comment by maia on December Monthly Bragging Thread · 2013-12-04T19:09:06.802Z · score: 3 (3 votes) · LW · GW

So if you answer no to that question, then you are biased. But it's not actually obvious which direction. What if non-Bitcoin-owning you is wrong, and you really should be buying it?

Also, if you have a lot of it, the extra Bitcoin might change your marginal value of money (because if you count the value of the BTC, you have more dollars than you otherwise would).

Comment by maia on Failing to update · 2013-12-02T22:59:42.856Z · score: 0 (2 votes) · LW · GW

Um... because I terminally value people being happy?

(There are sometimes situations where making some people sad makes other people more happy, but I don't think this is one of those.)

Comment by maia on Failing to update · 2013-12-02T20:55:31.668Z · score: 3 (5 votes) · LW · GW

I need a lot of mental health assistance to get to a place where I can afford to deserve the mental health assistance that I need to get to that place, and I'm not comfortable being a leech on society.

Not sure if this is at all helpful, but: Do you see the contradiction in that sentence? This is a situation that is unfixable unless you go into debt to society a bit in order to pull yourself up. As a taxpayer, I would much rather you get help, even if you don't feel like you "deserve" it, than see you be sad forever. I don't care if you are a leech or not; you're a person, and therefore you being sad is a bad thing.

Comment by maia on A critique of effective altruism · 2013-12-02T18:39:17.275Z · score: 1 (1 votes) · LW · GW

This is my main problem with the idea that we should have a far-future focus. I just have no idea at all how to get a grip on far-future predictions, and so it seems absurdly unlikely that my predictions will be correct, making it therefore also absurdly unlikely that I (or even most people) will be able to make a difference except in a very few cases by pure luck.

Comment by maia on Rationality Quotes December 2013 · 2013-12-02T16:48:52.109Z · score: 24 (26 votes) · LW · GW

More of these gems, for the lazy:

Our World: Firm’s Meteoric Rise Explained by Daring Strategy, Bold Leadership

Mathematically Literate World: Firm’s Meteoric Rise Explained by Good Luck, Selection Bias

Our World: One Dead in Shark Attack; See Tips for Shark Safety Inside

Mathematically Literate World: One Dead in Tragic, Highly Unlikely Event; See Tips for Something Useful Inside

Our World: Poll Finds 2016 Candidates Neck and Neck

Mathematically Literate World: Poll Finds 2016 Predictions Futile, Absurd

Comment by maia on In Praise of Tribes that Pretend to Try: Counter-"Critique of Effective Altruism" · 2013-12-02T16:38:20.864Z · score: 0 (0 votes) · LW · GW

if you see people making large life decisions that look like they're pretending to try (e.g. satisficing on donations or career choice), this should be a red flag.

This seems to expose a bit of a tension between two possible goals for the EA movement. One of them is "We need more rigor and people to be trying harder!" and the other one is "We need to bring in lots of people who aren't trying quite as hard; we can have a bigger total impact by getting lots of people to do just a little bit." The second one is closer to what e.g. Peter Singer is trying to do, by setting a low baseline threshold of doing good and trying to make it the norm for as many people as possible to do good at that threshold.

Is it actually that bad to have people in the movement who are just doing good because of social pressure? If we make sure that the things we're socially pressuring people to do are actually very good things, then that could be good anyway. Even if they're just satisficing, this could be a net good, as long as we're raising the threshold of what "satisficing" is by a lot.

I guess the potential problem there is that maybe if satisficing is the norm, we'll encourage complacency, and thereby get fewer people who are actually trying really hard instead of just satisficing. Maybe it's just a balancing act.

Having feeling-oriented people signalling outcome-orientation is stopping the outcome-oriented people from pushing forward the EA state of the art, because it adds epistemic inertia (feeling-oriented people have less belief pressure from truth-seeking and more from social satisficing).

I'm not sure I understand you here. Are you saying that because feeling-oriented people will pretty much believe what they are socially pressured to believe, the outcome-oriented people will also stop truth-seeking?